How Long Do Green Coffee Beans Last?

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So, first of all, we didn’t even know what a green coffee bean was until we were today years old. We thought all coffee came looking like the adorable brown bean we all know and love. But that’s not true. Before you get your coffee ground just the way you like it, it has to be roasted first. Before all of that happens, your bean juice in its original form is a green bean. That’s fun.

Why would you want the green beans though? Why wouldn’t you want to get roasted until they are that perfect shade of brown beans? Well, it’s because the green version has quite a few benefits. Let’s brew this one together and find out what’s so great about being green.

They last forever

Well, maybe not forever. How long do green coffee beans last? A long time. Longer than you probably need them to if you are a pretty avid coffee drinker. Let’s compare our different kinds of beans.

Roasted coffee beans

These guys are okay for almost 2 months if stored properly. But that’s as is, without being ground up. After about 6 to 8 weeks, these whole beans will start to lose their luster.

Coffee grounds

You only have a few weeks to enjoy these. Once you have opened the pack of grounds, it’s best to try to use it up as fast as you can. Two weeks is around when you’ll notice your coffee tasting a little stale.

Green coffee beans

If stored properly, your green coffee beans can be fine to use for at least a year after they have been processed. A year? Who keeps coffee that long?

Now, there is a rumor that if frozen that these green guys can last forever. Really, forever. We are making room in our freezer as we speak.

The special way to store them

So, we are telling you that green coffee beans can be stored for at least a year. What’s the catch? The only one we see is that they have to be stored properly. Fair enough. If you are wondering if there is a magical way to store these superior beans, sorry to tell you that’s not so.

You need to store these like you would most other food items in your kitchen. Make sure these are in a cabinet or other place where they won’t be exposed to sunlight. Like other beans, you want the temperature around 60 degrees. You want to make sure they stay dry, too. Moisture buildup can lead to mold, which is gross and you’ll have to throw your precious beans away.

But if you do want to see if they really can last forever, break them up into smaller portions, put them in airtight containers or bags, and pop them in the freezer. Then you can take out what you need to get through that week.

Well, now we have to see if these beans live up to all of this hype. Even if we don’t like the taste, we will finish the pot because no bean deserves to be left behind.

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