How To Use Cinnamon In Your Coffee

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It’s safe to say that most people have a way of making a cup of coffee uniquely theirs. For some, it might be adding a lot of sugar, for others, they might not add any at all.

It could be that some of us like our coffee with a lot of milk or creamer, while others out there take their coffee black.

Whatever way you choose to drink your coffee, though, is all down to personal preference.

Now, that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be creative and try new add-ins. After all, you never know what you might like unless you try new things! 

So, here’s the deal, we have a suggestion for your next cup of coffee; a unique and spicy addition to any brew. Can you guess what it might be? Maybe the title gives it away; it’s cinnamon.

Why add cinnamon to your coffee?

Well, the reasons are numerous and here we’ll list 10 of them:

  1. It tastes better. Some people find that adding cinnamon to coffee heightens the flavor and adds a little extra sweetness without increasing the actual sugar content of your cuppa.

  2. With less sugar floating around your system, you’ll be able to keep those blood sugar levels steadier, preventing energy spikes and crashes.

  3. Cinnamon ups the ante on cognitive function. While the caffeine in coffee will get you up and going, cinnamon takes that up a notch and hones cognitive abilities, according to studies from the University of Georgia. Additionally, your overall brain function improves with the addition of cinnamon, which means visual and motor skills get an edge.

  4. Since it satisfies the sweet cravings many of us have, it’ll keep the munchies at bay. Coupled with preventing sugar spikes and dips which further fuel hunger, cinnamon kicks sweet cravings to the curb.

  5. Additionally, cinnamon is pretty packed with vitamins and minerals. With fiber, calcium, manganese, and iron, this spice lends itself nicely to a cup of joe and sets the bar higher for other coffee add-ins.

  6.  It’s thought that the pain-relieving qualities of cinnamon, can help soothe symptoms of a cold. From opening up the sinuses to helping decrease mucus production, cinnamon can play a role in helping us feel better when we’re poorly.
  7. And you know what else is great about cinnamon? It’s antioxidative qualities. Brimming with antioxidants, this sweet and smoky spice packs a powerful punch – so if that’s not reason enough to add it to your cup of joe, we don’t know what is!

  8. What’s even better than that, is that cinnamon is thought to boost our immune system.

  9. Furthermore, it’s believed that the spice is as heart-friendly as they come, by lowering triglycerides that contribute to clogged arteries.

  10. Finally, its antimicrobial, antiviral, and antibacterial properties are said to help promote gut health. So, while we’re enjoying the delicious flavor combination of cinnamon coffee, the spice gets to work in our digestive system as a bonus.

Now, how do we use cinnamon in coffee?

The first thing that needs to be said, is that adding it to coffee after it’s been brewed, isn’t recommended as it tends to clump. It’s preferable for most people to add the cinnamon to their grounds before they’re brewed.

Just be aware that the spice can also clump on filter paper, so if you’re making a drip or pour-over coffee, you might find yourself with a coffee reservoir, so exercising a little extra patience will help prevent a spill-over.

 This is how you use cinnamon in your coffee: add ground cinnamon to your ground coffee beans and brew your joe as usual. That’s it!

However, if you’ve decided after brewing your coffee, that you’d like to spice up your brew a bit, then let the cinnamon dissolve or disperse in some milk first (as it apparently dissolves well in it), and then add that to your coffee. It’ll also add a whole new flavor dimension to your beverage. Delicious!

 Now, if you’re cold brewing coffee, we suggest you employ the help of cinnamon sticks to prevent your filter from getting gummed up. A couple of cinnamon sticks broken down into smaller pieces, placed amongst its coffee ground friends and brewed as normal, should leave you with a coffee that’s second to nothing.

Look, coffee with any add-in is delightful, but coffee with cinnamon comes with some perks – and we’re not just talking about the caffeinated kind.

What are we talking about? The health benefit kind. Here’s what six of them are:

  1. Glycemic control – cinnamon may have a moderate effect in this arena when consumed as part of a well-balanced diet.
  2. Prebiotic properties – That is to say, this spice can help support the growth of beneficial flora (a.k.a. gut bacteria) and hamper the growth of the harmful kind, which can be of benefit to overall gut health.
  3. Antioxidants – while mean fruits and vegetables contain these disease-fighting molecules, cinnamon too, contains the same or similar kinds. The antioxidants in cinnamon are believed to have anti-inflammatory properties.
  4.  Antiviral, Antifungal, and Antibacterial properties – the same compound that gives cinnamon its distinctive aroma, Cinnamaldehyde, is believed to hold antiviral, antifungal, and antibacterial superpowers.
  5.  Lowers blood pressure – some research suggests that cinnamon can play a role in reducing blood pressure in the short term, though more studies are required to conclusively determine this.
  6. Improved digestion – as part of ancient medicinal tinctures, cinnamon has long been thought to aid in easing digestive discomfort with its prebiotic, antimicrobial properties. It’s believed that the warming sensation that cinnamon elicits, encourages blood flow to the digestive tract, thereby increasing oxygen to certain areas to ward off illness.

The bottom line is this, folks: cinnamon doesn’t just smell good; it also tastes great! With the host of beneficial properties held snuggly in its warm and spicy bosom, we can let those loose on our cup of joe by simply brewing some with the next cup. Sugar and cinnamon spice is every bit as nice as it sounds – especially when added into a cup of joe!

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