What are the most popular espresso drinks?

Table of Contents

Popular espresso drinks

A trip to the nearest fancy coffee shop can be a bewildering experience. It’s not just the endless menus of beverages with exotic names, but also the people around you ordering this or that, asking for more or less milk, inquiring about flavors. How do they even know all that? 

The situation is even more sensitive when you’re part of a larger group, you don’t want to sound odd, ordering something nobody drinks these days anymore, do you?

To help with that, let’s have a look at the 5 most popular espresso drinks.

1) Latte

The Latte is very popular these days as it allows a lot of variation and experimentation with all sorts of flavors. Basically, a Latte combines one part of coffee (one or two shots of espresso) with two parts steamed milk, possibly even more. 

Many people prefer Latte because it doesn’t seem as strong as espresso, although the caffeine content is the same. And, let’s be honest, people like Latte because it looks cool – those exquisite designs on top of the froth layer that are all the rage these days make the drink, and you, feel special! Did you know that those intricate froth designs are considered a form of art? Latte art!

Last, but not least, it’s the flavors that make Latte so appealing. It started with simple flavors, vanilla or cinnamon, but now coffee shops try to outdo each other and come up with all sorts of novelty drinks, tempting customers with lattes that taste like peppermint, Irish crème, caramel, almond, hazelnut, toffee, buttered rum, orange, raspberry or even ginger and pumpkin.

2) Cappuccino

Cappuccino remains pretty popular among espresso-based drinks, as it is stronger than Latte. A cappuccino contains one part coffee (a single or double espresso) and just one part of milk, whereas the Latte has at least two parts milk. Typically, a cappuccino comes with a layer of milk foam on top.

Obviously, most coffee shops today offer various types of milk, like soy or almond milk.

3) Flat White

Flat White drinks have been steadily rising in popularity in recent years. While it still contains espresso and milk, Flat White differs from latte or cappuccino as it doesn’t have that micro-foam layer. That’s why it is called flat!

To put it another way, for a cappuccino the milk is foamed to include a lot of air, while for a Flat White it’s barely frothed, so the top layer is much smoother, wetter and thinner than a cappuccino’s.

4) Americano

Americano stands out among espresso-based drinks as it is the only one that doesn’t contain milk. This is why it is also called Long Black. Americano is very popular among those who do not enjoy the strong taste of an espresso. The only way they will tolerate it is watered down. 

This is exactly what Americano is – an espresso extracted over a cup of hot water. Proportions can vary. Generally, an Americano is half espresso, half water, but for those prefer even weaker tastes there’s also the diluted variant – one part espresso and two parts water

Legend has it the Americano was invented in Italy during WWII by local baristas trying to offer American soldiers a beverage that was closer to the taste of regular drip-coffee!

5) Cortado

The cortado is perhaps the most baffling of all espresso-based drinks. Its name comes from the Spanish cortar, which means to cut. Cortado is an espresso cut with a little milk to reduce acidity. In this, it is quite similar to caffe macchiato, which is also an espresso topped with steamed milk. 

A barista will tell you the difference between a cortado and a macchiato is that the former has less foam than the latter, therefore the proper way to prepare it to steam the milk before it starts frothing.

Another way of describing a cortado is that it is a less foamy cappuccino. Cortado is very popular in Spain and Portugal, as well as in Latin America, while in Australia it goes by the name of Piccolo Latte.

So, if you’re into novelty coffee and would like to experiment with various flavors, you should definitely go for a latte, but do keep in mind that a cappuccino or a flat white has less milk and the taste of coffee is more noticeable.

What is Latte coffee?

Most coffee shop drinks are based on espresso. A shot of espresso is prepared with an espresso machine, which forces a small quantity of water at high pressure through a puck of ground coffee

Now, espresso is an excellent drink just as it is, especially if it’s a good quality coffee that allows the formation of a nice thick layer of foam, known as crema, on top of it. 

However, simple espresso has fallen in popularity over the past few years, because people want variation and cups of coffee that look like a work of art. 

The Latte is very popular these days as it allows a lot of variation and experimentation with all sorts of flavors. Basically, a Latte combines one part of coffee (one or two shots of espresso) with two parts steamed milk, possibly even more. 

Many people prefer Latte because it doesn’t seem as strong as espresso, although the caffeine content is the same. And, let’s be honest, people like Latte because it looks cool – those exquisite designs on top of the froth layer that are all the rage these days make the drink, and you, feel special! 

Did you know that those intricate froth designs are considered a form of art? Latte art!

Last, but not least, it’s the flavors that make Latte so appealing. It started with simple flavors, vanilla or cinnamon, but now coffee shops try to outdo each other and come up with all sorts of novelty drinks, flavored that taste like peppermint, Irish crème, caramel, almond, hazelnut, toffee, buttered rum, orange, raspberry or even ginger and pumpkin.

What is the difference between latte and cappuccino?

Cappuccino remains pretty popular among espresso-based drinks, as it is stronger than Latte. A cappuccino contains one part coffee (a single or double espresso) and just one part of milk, whereas the Latte has at least two parts milk. Typically, a cappuccino comes with a layer of milk foam on top.

Obviously, most coffee shops today offer various types of milk, like soy or almond milk.

What is Flat White?

Flat White drinks have been steadily rising in popularity in recent years. While it still contains espresso and milk, Flat White differs from latte or cappuccino as it doesn’t have that micro-foam layer. That’s why it is called flat!

To put it another way, for a cappuccino the milk is foamed to include a lot of air, while for a Flat White it’s barely frothed, so the top layer is much smoother, wetter and thinner than a cappuccino’s.

So, if you’re into novelty coffee and would like to experiment with various flavors, you should definitely go for a latte, but do keep in mind that a cappuccino or a flat white has less milk and the taste of coffee is more noticeable.

Share This Article

Sources