What are the Types of Infused Coffee?

Table of Contents

Types of Infused Coffee

There are so many types of coffee makers on the market, no wonder people are confused and don’t know what to choose. Yet, if you think about it, most use the same two basic methods – infusion and boiling.

Infused coffee refers to steeping coffee grounds in water to extract all the flavors and aromas.

Drip Coffee - America’s Favorite Brew

Drip Coffee is the most popular type of coffee in the US and drip coffee makers are a staple of the American kitchen.

What many refer to as filter coffee is made with a simple enough machine. All you need to do is measure the water for the number of cups you want to make, add it to the reservoir where it is heated and forced into the filter cone where the coffee grounds are.

As the water makes its way through the grounds coffee starts dripping into the glass carafe and your eye-opener is ready to serve.

Tip: For a perfect brew you need to put two tablespoons of coffee grounds for 6 fl oz of water, to get a regular cup of coffee.

How to Make Coffee with a French Press

This is another popular and easy to use coffee maker and also among the most affordable machines you can get. You will have to heat the water yourself, though.

The coffee to water ratio is the same. Measure the coffee grounds and put them in the French Press, Meanwhile, heat enough water for how many cups you want to prepare.

The water shouldn’t be too hot or it will scorch the grounds, nor should it be too cold or your coffee will be weak and under-extracted. The best thing is to bring the water to the boiling point, remove it from the heat source, and let it cool down for one minute.

Pour the water over the coffee grounds, close the lid of the French Press, and shake it vigorously. Let it simmer for four minutes then push the plunger down to filter out the coffee grounds. Now you can pour the coffee!

Tip: Experts recommend using a burr grinder for this type of coffee maker, as you want the grounds to be consistent in size and not too fine Very small, powdery particles can go through the filter creating a gunky sediment in your cup!

Some Like it Cold - The Art of Making Cold Brew

Cold brew is very different from traditional coffee as you use cold water. While hot water can extract the coffee molecules in a couple of minutes, cold water requires a lot of time for the same job.

If you want to taste a cup of cold brew in the morning, you will have to put it on before going to bed. Well, not exactly put it on as you do not put it on the stove or anything.

You will need a Mason jar for this type of brew. First, measure the coffee grounds. For this type of coffee, the ratio is one cup of coffee grounds to four cups of water at room temperature. Put both in the Mason jar, screw the cap on and place it in the fridge. Leave it to simmer for 12-14 hours and you will have a delicious cold brew waiting for you in the fridge.

Tip: Some people prefer to put a little more coffee to make the cold brew more concentrated. Keep in mind that if the brew is too strong you can cut it with a little cold water. Or hot water if you want to warm your brew.

No matter what sort of brewing method we use, deep down we are all the same and we all want good coffee! Which of these infusion methods you prefer is entirely up to you!

Share This Article

Sources